Another tractor, a Ferguson this time.

cjet69

Tractorologist
Senior Member
Member
Got this Ferguson yesterday at the same place we picked up a Yanmar. I don't know what model it is yet. I'll check the tag today. Its been sitting for years, but in a shed so it should be decent shape.

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cjet69

Tractorologist
Senior Member
Member
Just looked at the tag and it is a TO and the serial # 14558 looks like a 1949 TO-20 if I'm reading things right.

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cjet69

Tractorologist
Senior Member
Member
Was this also a freebie?
Nope, had to give some money for this one.

It should be a runner after we get the fuel system cleaned up, new battery, and change the points and condenser. My dad did some engine work years ago on this tractor. He bored the block for some larger sleeve's that the owner had picked up that didn't fit his block. There shouldn't be too many hours on it after it was rebuilt, but I do worry that it is missing the air cleaner to carb tube. I hope he just pulled it off and wasn't running it that way.

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olcowhand

Daniel In KY
Staff member
Administrator
Surely he didn't run it without the air filter connected. These Furgs look so much like the Ford 8n.
 

cjet69

Tractorologist
Senior Member
Member
Had the charger on the battery overnight. It had enough juice to spin the starter, but the bendix drive wouldn't engage. Pulled the starter out and found light rust on the shaft which I cleaned off and got the bendix working freely. Still need to install and test. After charging the battery again I did a load test and it looks like it needs a new battery. I also pumped up all of the tires and found the cores are leaking in the rears which appear to have calcium in them. We always have some cores on hand so it should be an easy fix. I turned the fuel on and got a bunch of crud in the sediment bowl and the carb leaked so they will need to be pulled and cleaned. I'm making some progress.

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cjet69

Tractorologist
Senior Member
Member
Pulled and cleaned the carb today. Then installed the carb, starter and a battery from a different tractor. Cranked it a little and it fired up and ran pretty good. The fuel tank didn't look too bad so I didn't pull it, but did see some crud after running and driving it a little. When I first started the tractor it would grind when trying to put it in gear. I shut it off and put a cresent wrench on the PTO and with the clutch depressed I was able to break it loose pretty easy. I think it will make a good tractor when we get all the little things fixed on it.
 

olcowhand

Daniel In KY
Staff member
Administrator
Over the years, I've had some dirt bikes I'd bought that had been sitting so long the clutch packs were stuck together. I'd idle along in low gear with clutch pulled in and bump into the Maple tree in my yard. Worked every time to pop the plates apart. Can't recommend that for a tractor though! LOL
 

cjet69

Tractorologist
Senior Member
Member
I forgot to add that it looks like the tractor needs a new water pump. It actually started leaking when we first looked at it. I rolled the engine over to see if it was stuck or not and it started dripping antifreeze. I was hoping after running it some that it would stop, no such luck. The generator wasn't hooked up and it had a 12 volt battery in it so we will be installing an alternator.
 

Propane1

Tractorologist
Senior Member
Member
Some of those had a grease nipple on the water pump. You should have a look for that.

Noel
 

sheenist

New Member
Member
cjet69: Congrats on your "new" Fergie. They are indeed good tractors, had several features better than 8N's. One weakness to watch for is coolant in the oil pan. Some of the Continental engines had a casting problem. They would leak coolant in the center of the block between the cylinders on the bottom. Some people would put staybolts thru the blocks between the cylinders. This is not a rumor, but a personal observation of mine while working in a garage. Not a lot of them were so afflicted, but some of the early ones did so. Lots of time, leakage could be controlled with good stop-leak. An easy way to check for this, is to let it set for a couple of weeks and then crack the oil pan drain plug a turn or so. If the block is leaking, the first thing you will see is a little water. Good luck.
Sheenist
 
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