Brought another project home

cjet69

Tractorologist
Senior Member
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#1
Made the deal and brought it home today. Had to pump up all the tires and replace the valve core in one rear wheel before we could add air. We got it pulled out of the PO's barn and towed it about 20 feet and it fired up. Dad drove it the rest of the way home. It need's lots of TLC. Its a 1936 John Deere BO.

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alleyyooper

Tractorologist
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#2
Are parts missing? Wouldn't a BO be a orchard model B?

Most companies orchard models had half covers for the rear wheels and some even had covers over the front.

Looks like little to do on the project other than a wash and new paint if yoiur so inclined.




:D Al
 

cjet69

Tractorologist
Senior Member
Member
#3
Are parts missing? Wouldn't a BO be a orchard model B?

Most companies orchard models had half covers for the rear wheels and some even had covers over the front.

Looks like little to do on the project other than a wash and new paint if yoiur so inclined.




:D Al
Yes, its an Orchard model. Most came with these fenders, but you could get the Citrus fenders which covered the whole rear wheel.
 

JDJake

Tractorologist
Member
#6
Here's a few facts, John Deere would send BO's out to Yakima Washington without the wheels. A guy named Jesse Lindemann would take these wheel less tractors and put crawler tracks on them, making the first Deeres on crawlers. He did such a great job making them that John Deere hired him and he went on to help design the John Deere MC, Deeres first official crawler.
 

Texas Horses Hogs and Deeres

Tractorologist
Staff member
Administrator
#8
Here's a few facts, John Deere would send BO's out to Yakima Washington without the wheels. A guy named Jesse Lindemann would take these wheel less tractors and put crawler tracks on them, making the first Deeres on crawlers. He did such a great job making them that John Deere hired him and he went on to help design the John Deere MC, Deeres first official crawler.
In 1930 after becoming a John Deere dealer, Lindermann converted a John Deere model GP to tracks and that started the JD crawler conversion. Lindermann also converted several D models to crawlers. And those first crawlers were actually called Lindermann Crawlers before John Deere hired Lindermann to design the JD crawlers.
 

alleyyooper

Tractorologist
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#10
Looks like what we cll pole barn spikes. they come in different sizes I know from great tent stakes and one I didn't know about JD repair spikes LOL.

:D Al
 

cjet69

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#11
We found a 1936 BR parts tractor just a mile or two from us. Not sure if the crankshaft is good, but for the price I think we will just get it because of all of the other useable parts. Might not get it until next weekend.
 

cjet69

Tractorologist
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#12
Hauled the 1936 BR parts tractor home. I pulled the nut to get a look at the clutch splines. Looks like someone repaired it by cutting a couple key ways for some square key stock. We will need to pull the crank to see just what has been done, but if its a decent job we may try using this crank for now if it measures up. We don't expect to do any heavy pulling with it so it might just work and we can continue to look for a good used crank or try repairing the one we have.

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cjet69

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#13
Got some of the parts tractor torn down. I knew there would be rust in the cylinders, but everywhere else in the engine was surprisingly rust free. After pulling the head it looked like the exhaust valves were new. I shot some ATF/Acetone mixture on the valve stems and 3 of them loosened right up and with some gentle tapping on the remaining stuck valve it freed up also. Tomorrow I will try to pull the block and then it time to go after the crankshaft. I also found that the trans shifts thru all the gears easily so its probably in pretty good shape which is a bonus.

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cjet69

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#15
Finally got the flywheel pulled off today. It took plenty of heat, lots of puller pressure, and wedges before it started to move. Now I can go after the crank and get it removed. I put the block in the press and pushed the pistons out. They came out without much effort and should clean up ok. The bores still need to be cleaned up to see if there is much pitting.

As I pull pieces off this tractor I keep noticing new parts that were installed that are still in good shape like a new clutch pulley roller bearing, first reduction gear bearing, and a new float in the carburetor. Really makes me wonder how or why this ended up out in a blackberry patch with no spark plugs in it filling with water.


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