Tractor tarps

chieffan

Tractorologist
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Several years ago when they cracked down on the bill boards along the interstate a lot of semi trailers started popping up along the property line fence, serving as they billboard. Nothing DOT could do about it for several years and than as long as the message was not changed they were grandfathered in.
 

jabelman

Tractorologist
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Several years ago when they cracked down on the bill boards along the interstate a lot of semi trailers started popping up along the property line fence, serving as they billboard. Nothing DOT could do about it for several years and than as long as the message was not changed they were grandfathered in.
Reminds me of the guy who got denied to put up a shed. He went out and purchased a few old school buses at an auction and kept them registered on his property.
 

MFDAC

Tractorologist
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Those narrow strips are a lot easier and quicker to put up in a wind than a big tarp would be. I would not want to be one of the guys trying to hold a 10 X 30' tarp 30' in the air in a 20 mph wind. Bill boards are leased for short periods of time so why go to the time consuming expense of hand painting them?
The glue-up poster boards were for very short term ads, but up here at least, would fall apart in a matter of weeks. No durability at all. There is very little demand for short term outdoor advertising any more. Most contracts are at least a year, sometimes even longer.

The best advantage of painted billboards is by far durability. They will outlast these tarp or bag signs as we called them in the business. Of course when billboard painting was in it's prime there was no technology to print the large scale media then.

The guys that hang those tarp sign faces can get one hung in no time, even with the wind. 2 guys and 2 bucket trucks make short work of it.

Now you guys got me thinking back to those days! This is my old billboard brush kit. Of course rollers were a big part of it too. With these brushes, lettering and painting pictorals could be accomplished. Pictorals are what sign painters called picture ads. Most folks call them murals nowadays. All those brushes have a "heel" and a "toe". They can only be used successfully in one direction. Specifically made for painting signs.

DAC

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MFDAC

Tractorologist
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Fired up the MF1450 and brought it in the shop this afternoon. As I drove it in the shop, my Ipod was playing an old Marty Robbins song called "Strawberry Roan". I think that has become the new nickname for the MF1450 as it is as ugly as that horse an old cowboy was trying to break---LOL!
Going to have to think about how to attach the tarp to the tractor now to keep it there in the 50-70 mph wind we get here!

DAC
 

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chieffan

Tractorologist
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Holding any tarp down in a wind is always an issue. Used to tarp a lot of wagon loads of hay bales and invariably a roped would break, come loose, grommet would pull out, etc. Had the best luck with tarp grippers. Pipe type outside about 6" long with about an inch opening down one side. Lay the tarp in the tube and force a smaller tube inside the larger tube on top of the tarp. Smaller tube has a rope about a foot long through it. Never had one of them let go but don't use bunge cords. To much give and will bounce loose or let the wind in under the tarp..
 

Gtractor

Tractorologist
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Looks good Doug but if the tractor is going to be outside where the sun can shine on the tarp, you need the tarp up off the ground some to allow air flow around the tractor or the temp differences will be great enough to cause MAJOR condensation and that would be worse than just sitting outside occasionally being wet.
If the sun won't be on the tarp it is still beneficial to keep it up enough for some air flow because there will still be some condensation.
 

MFDAC

Tractorologist
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Looks good Doug but if the tractor is going to be outside where the sun can shine on the tarp, you need the tarp up off the ground some to allow air flow around the tractor or the temp differences will be great enough to cause MAJOR condensation and that would be worse than just sitting outside occasionally being wet.
If the sun won't be on the tarp it is still beneficial to keep it up enough for some air flow because there will still be some condensation.
Thanks for the advice, Kris! It will be sitting on gravel in the sun. We get enough strong wind here where my concern is more to keep it from taking off like a kite rather than sealing out all the moisture. Also the humidity here rivals Arizona a good bit of the year. We have been running in the teens most of the time this fall. It's not long term storage either. I just need shop space when the tractors are not in use.

I agree 100%. A piece of tin or wood held down on top would keep the direct snow and rain off would be better than a snug tarp. Lot less trouble with mice uncovered also.
Don't seem to have trouble with mice Roger. That could change at any time I'm sure as we have had mice before. A couple of my old trucks and a camper sit for long periods of time and never had any of those nasty rodents in them that I have found.

DAC
 

chieffan

Tractorologist
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I looked closer at a local billboard today as I drove by at 35. Complete new pipe frame, big white fabric tarp with a bunch of grommets around the outside edge and looked like the rope or line was wrapped around the frame and through the grommets to pull it tight. Will have to check some of the others in the area.
 

Sawdust

Jim from Kentucky
Senior Member
Member
I looked closer at a local billboard today as I drove by at 35. Complete new pipe frame, big white fabric tarp with a bunch of grommets around the outside edge and looked like the rope or line was wrapped around the frame and through the grommets to pull it tight. Will have to check some of the others in the area.
Are you shopping with a ladder and a good knife :D
 
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