I hate philips screws

chieffan

Tractorologist
Senior Member
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First you need a GOOD bit that fits the screw. Second, use an impact if you cant get it loose by hand. MUST keep the bit straight into the screw or it will flair out. Real easy to move to the side while twisting. 1/4 drive impact works great for smaller screws, bolts, nuts, etc. Torx or square drive is the best way to go.
 

adamjd200

Tractorologist
Senior Member
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First you need a GOOD bit that fits the screw. Second, use an impact if you cant get it loose by hand. MUST keep the bit straight into the screw or it will flair out. Real easy to move to the side while twisting. 1/4 drive impact works great for smaller screws, bolts, nuts, etc. Torx or square drive is the best way to go.
Someone else pre damaged these, I went with this type.
images (3).jpeg
 

DennyIN

Tractorologist
Member
I think craftsman and maybe lowes has a tool or tool kit for that, search for screw extractor or screw out. I thought I had one, just went to look and can't find it, too much clutter.
 

rlnguy

New Member
Member
A little dab of valve grinding compound on the tip of the driver often helps it grip. Then lots of pressure inward (toward the screw), while turning, is my first 'go to" trick.
I've broken the tip off a few screwdrivers doing it this way, though-but the screw almost always comes out, without any damage to the part.
 

Sawdust

Tractorologist
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Glad it worked out for you & all is well. Dealing with hardware of any type can be frustrating these days a lot of it is junk. I go through drivers of all types regularly. I found seating the driver in the screw & tapping it lightly not only seats it but gives the screw head a slight impact to break the hug they have on what their holding.
 

chieffan

Tractorologist
Senior Member
Member
I found seating the driver in the screw & tapping it lightly not only seats it but gives the screw head a slight impact to break the hug they have on what their holding.
Same principal the had held impact's work on but I can never remember which way to turn the darn thing so don't use it.
 

MiCarl

Tractorologist
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Same principal the had held impact's work on but I can never remember which way to turn the darn thing so don't use it.
You turn it the same way you would a screw driver. As you do the handle will climb away from the bit. When it's tight smack it with a hammer.
 

chieffan

Tractorologist
Senior Member
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Thanks much. Will try and remember that for the next time. Those marks on the tool <-----> always confused me. Heck knew it would turn both ways.
 

Cvans

Tractorologist
Senior Member
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One of the problems with Phillips screws is there are several different specifications for them. Asian Phillips is different than ours. Found that out when buying screw drivers from Snap-on. Red handles were for Asian and black for American and they do not interchange well and tend to slip.
Their big advantage is in assembly work and alignment of the driver is not as critical as some others.
Excellent quality drivers are a must for best results.
 

chieffan

Tractorologist
Senior Member
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Same with straight slot screws but one can cheat a lot easier. Difference between a regular screwdriver bit and a gun screw driver bit. Regular bit is tapered where a gun screw driver bit is straight sided.
 

MacWorld

Tractorologist
Senior Member
Member
Their big advantage is in assembly work and alignment of the driver is not as critical as some others.
AFAIK the main advantage and IIRC the original goal of the Phillips was to get the driving tool to "cam out" when an appropriate torque is reached as to accelerate assembly lines.

As for Allen, they work properly but anyone that ever worked on an older German cars will probably have figured out that Torx is way better, the Allen is too close to a circle and strips out way too easily especially if the drive tool is cheap/worn, the fastener had rusted and/or is packed with stuff. To the extreme would be XZN (triple-square) and Polydrive, those can transmit a huge amount of torque

Otherwise I am biassed as being a Canadian, Robertson drive is hard to beat for wood work and up to 1/4" bolts :) There is even a rare #4 drive size and it was used even for counter-sunk lag screws i.e. 5/16"+ diameter !
 

dodge trucker

Tractorologist
Senior Member
Member
Ok then,
What's the difference between a Phillips and Reed prince?
I remember seeing crapsman screwdrivers in the set of 14-ish that they used to sell and the Phillips ones had a blue band where the Reed prince had a red band on the handle.

And when I was in high school one of my shop classes we had a "tool test" and the pix were typical 80s Xerox school printer quality, both looked identical on the page.
I think that the idiot shop teacher did this just to mess with me, he marked mine as having-2. 2 wrong answers. Supposedly I mixed up Phillips with Reed prince.
Other than on that stupid test (I think that it was sophomore year) I don't think I have ever seen or used a Reed prince fastener or driver.
 
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